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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

General Criteria for a Personality Disorder General Criteria for a Personality Disorder

DSM-IV DSM-5 Criteria – Revised June 2011

A. An enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior the deviates
markedly from the expectations of the individual’s culture. This
pattern is manifested in two (or more) of the following areas:

1. Cognition (i.e., ways of perceiving and interpreting self,
other people and events)

2. Affectivity (i.e., the range, intensity, liability, and
appropriateness of emotional response)

3. Interpersonal functioning
4. Impulse control

B. The enduring pattern is inflexible and pervasive across a broad

range of personal and social situations.

C. The enduring pattern leads to clinically significant distress or
impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of
functioning.

D. The pattern is stable and of long duration, and its onset can be
traced back at least to adolescence or early adulthood.

E. The enduring pattern is not better accounted for as a manifestation
or consequence of another mental disorder.

F. The enduring pattern is not due to the direct physiological effects
of a substance (e.g., a drug abuse, a medication) or a general
medical condition (e.g., head trauma).

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose a personality disorder,
the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in self (identity or self-direction) and
interpersonal (empathy or intimacy) functioning.

B. One or more pathological personality trait domains or trait facets.

C. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are relatively stable across time and
consistent across situations.

D. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not better understood as
normative for the individual‟s developmental stage or socio-
cultural environment.

E. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s

personality trait expression are not solely due to the direct
physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse,
medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., severe head
trauma).

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

Antisocial Personality Disorder Antisocial Personality Disorder

DSM-IV Criteria DSM-5 Criteria – Revised April 2012

A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the
rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three
(or more) of the following: having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from
another.

1. Failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful
behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that
are grounds for arrest.

2. Deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases,
or conning others for personal profit or pleasure.

3. Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead.

4. Irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated
physical fights or assaults.

5. Reckless disregard for safety of self or others.

6. Consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure
to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial
obligations.

7. Lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or
rationalizing.

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose antisocial personality
disorder, the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in personality functioning manifest by:

1. Impairments in self functioning (a or b):

a. Identity: Ego-centrism; self-esteem derived from
personal gain, power, or pleasure.

b. Self-direction: Goal-setting based on personal

gratification; absence of prosocial internal
standards associated with failure to conform to
lawful or culturally normative ethical behavior.

AND

2. Impairments in interpersonal functioning (a or b):

a. Empathy: Lack of concern for feelings, needs, or
suffering of others; lack of remorse after hurting or
mistreating another.

b. Intimacy: Incapacity for mutually intimate

relationships, as exploitation is a primary means of
relating to others, including by deceit and coercion;
use of dominance or intimidation to control others.

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

B. The individual is at least age 18 years.

C. There is evidence of Conduct Disorder with onset before age 15

years.

D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the
course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode.

B. Pathological personality traits in the following domains:
1. Antagonism, characterized by:

a. Manipulativeness: Frequent use of subterfuge to
influence or control others; use of seduction,
charm, glibness, or ingratiation to achieve one„s
ends.

b. Deceitfulness: Dishonesty and fraudulence;

misrepresentation of self; embellishment or
fabrication when relating events.

c. Callousness: Lack of concern for feelings or
problems of others; lack of guilt or remorse about
the negative or harmful effects of one„s actions on
others; aggression; sadism.

d. Hostility: Persistent or frequent angry feelings;
anger or irritability in response to minor slights and
insults; mean, nasty, or vengeful behavior.

2. Disinhibition, characterized by:

a. Irresponsibility: Disregard for – and failure to
honor – financial and other obligations or
commitments; lack of respect for – and lack of
follow through on – agreements and promises.

b. Impulsivity: Acting on the spur of the moment in
response to immediate stimuli; acting on a
momentary basis without a plan or consideration
of outcomes; difficulty establishing and following
plans.

c. Risk taking: Engagement in dangerous, risky, and
potentially self-damaging activities, unnecessarily
and without regard for consequences; boredom
proneness and thoughtless initiation of activities to

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

counter boredom; lack of concern for one„s
limitations and denial of the reality of personal
danger

C. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are relatively stable across time and
consistent across situations.

D. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s

personality trait expression are not better understood as
normative for the individual‟s developmental stage or socio-
cultural environment.

E. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s

personality trait expression are not solely due to the direct
physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse,
medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., severe head
trauma).

F. The individual is at least age 18 years.

Avoidant Personality Disorder Avoidant Personality Disorder

DSM-IV Criteria DSM-5 Criteria – Revised June 2011

A. A pervasive pattern of social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, and
hypersensitivity to negative evaluation, beginning by early adulthood
and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four (or more) of
the following:

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose avoidant personality
disorder, the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in personality functioning manifest by:
1. Impairments in self functioning (a or b):

a. Identity: Low self-esteem associated with self-appraisal
socially inept, personally unappealing, or inferior;
excessive feelings of shame or inadequacy.

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

1. Avoids occupational activities that involve significant

interpersonal contact, because of fears of criticism, disapproval,
or rejection.

2. Is unwilling to get involved with people unless certain of being
liked.

3. Shows restraint within intimate relationships because of the fear
of being shamed or ridiculed.

4. Is preoccupied with being criticized or rejected in social
situations.

5. Is inhibited in new interpersonal situations because of feelings of
inadequacy.

6. Views self as socially inept, personally unappealing, or inferior to
others.

7. Is unusually reluctant to take personal risks or to engage in any
new activities because they may prove embarrassing.

b. Self-direction: Unrealistic standards for behavior
associated with reluctance to pursue goals, take personal
risks, or engage in new activities involving interpersonal
contact.

AND

2. Impairments in interpersonal functioning (a or b):
a. Empathy: Preoccupation with, and sensitivity to, criticism

or rejection, associated with distorted inference of others‟
perspectives as negative.

b. Intimacy: Reluctance to get involved with people unless
being certain of being liked; diminished mutuality within
intimate relationships because of fear of being shamed or
ridiculed.

B. Pathological personality traits in the following domains:
1. Detachment, characterized by:

a. Withdrawal: Reticence in social situations; avoidance of
social contacts and activity; lack of initiation of social
contact.

b. Intimacy avoidance: Avoidance of close or romantic
relationships, interpersonal attachments, and intimate
sexual relationships.

c. Anhedonia: Lack of enjoyment from, engagement in, or
energy for life‟s experiences; deficits in the capacity to feel
pleasure or take interest in things.

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

2. Negative Affectivity, characterized by:
a. Anxiousness: Intense feelings of nervousness, tenseness,

or panic, often in reaction to social situations; worry about
the negative effects of past unpleasant experiences and
future negative possibilities; feeling fearful, apprehensive,
or threatened by uncertainty; fears of embarrassment.

C. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are relatively stable across time and
consistent across situations.

D. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not better understood as normative
for the individual‟s developmental stage or socio-cultural
environment.

E. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not solely due to the direct
physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse,
medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., severe head
trauma).

Borderline Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder

DSM-IV Criteria DSM-5 Criteria – Revised June 2011

A. A pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-
image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early
adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose borderline personality
disorder, the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in personality functioning manifest by:
1. Impairments in self functioning (a or b):

a. Identity: Markedly impoverished, poorly developed, or

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

(or more) of the following:

1. Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. Note: Do

not include suicidal or self-mutilating behavior covered in
Criterion 5.

2. A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships
characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization
and devaluation.

3. Identity disturbance: markedly and persistently unstable self
image or sense of self.

4. Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-
damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless
driving, binge eating). Note: Do not include suicidal or self-
mutilating behavior covered in Criterion 5.

5. Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-
mutilating behavior.

6. Affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood (e.g.,
intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a
few hours and only rarely more than a few days).

7. Chronic feelings of emptiness.

8. Inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g.,
frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical
fights).

9. Transient, stress-related paranoid ideation or severe
dissociative symptoms.

unstable self-image, often associated with excessive self-
criticism; chronic feelings of emptiness; dissociative states
under stress.

b. Self-direction: Instability in goals, aspirations, values, or
career plans.

AND

2. Impairments in interpersonal functioning (a or b):
a. Empathy: Compromised ability to recognize the feelings

and needs of others associated with interpersonal
hypersensitivity (i.e., prone to feel slighted or insulted);
perceptions of others selectively biased toward negative
attributes or vulnerabilities.

b. Intimacy: Intense, unstable, and conflicted close
relationships, marked by mistrust, neediness, and anxious
preoccupation with real or imagined abandonment; close
relationships often viewed in extremes of idealization and
devaluation and alternating between over involvement and
withdrawal.

B. Pathological personality traits in the following domains:
1. Negative Affectivity, characterized by:

a. Emotional liability: Unstable emotional experiences and
frequent mood changes; emotions that are easily aroused,
intense, and/or out of proportion to events and
circumstances.

b. Anxiousness: Intense feelings of nervousness,
tenseness, or panic, often in reaction to interpersonal
stresses; worry about the negative effects of past
unpleasant experiences and future negative possibilities;
feeling fearful, apprehensive, or threatened by uncertainty;
fears of falling apart or losing control.

c. Separation insecurity: Fears of rejection by – and/or

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

separation from – significant others, associated with fears
of excessive dependency and complete loss of autonomy.

d. Depressivity: Frequent feelings of being down, miserable,
and/or hopeless; difficulty recovering from such moods;
pessimism about the future; pervasive shame; feeling of
inferior self-worth; thoughts of suicide and suicidal
behavior.

2. Disinhibition, characterized by:
a. Impulsivity: Acting on the spur of the moment in response

to immediate stimuli; acting on a momentary basis without
a plan or consideration of outcomes; difficulty establishing
or following plans; a sense of urgency and self-harming
behavior under emotional distress.

b. Risk taking: Engagement in dangerous, risky, and
potentially self-damaging activities, unnecessarily and
without regard to consequences; lack of concern for one‟s
limitations and denial of the reality of personal danger.

3. Antagonism, characterized by:
a. Hostility: Persistent or frequent angry feelings; anger or

irritability in response to minor slights and insults.

C. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are relatively stable across time and
consistent across situations.

D. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not better understood as normative
for the individual‟s developmental stage or socio-cultural
environment.

E. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not solely due to the direct
physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse,
medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., severe head

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

trauma).

Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder

DSM-IV Criteria DSM-5 Criteria – Revised June 2011

A. A pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for
admiration, and lack of empathy, beginning by early adulthood and
present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the
following:

1. Has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates

achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior
without commensurate achievements).

2. Is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power,
brilliance, beauty, or ideal love.

3. Believes that he or she is “special” and unique and can only be
understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-
status people (or institutions).

4. Requires excessive admiration.

5. Has a sense of entitlement, i.e., unreasonable expectations of
especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his
or her expectations.

6. Is interpersonally exploitative, i.e., takes advantage of others to
achieve his or her own ends.

7. Lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the
feelings and needs of others.

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose narcissistic personality
disorder, the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in personality functioning manifest by:

1. Impairments in self functioning (a or b):
a. Identity: Excessive reference to others for self-definition

and self-esteem regulation; exaggerated self-appraisal
may be inflated or deflated, or vacillate between extremes;
emotional regulation mirrors fluctuations in self-esteem.

b. Self-direction: Goal-setting is based on gaining approval
from others; personal standards are unreasonably high in
order to see oneself as exceptional, or too low based on a
sense of entitlement; often unaware of own motivations.

AND

2. Impairments in interpersonal functioning (a or b):
a. Empathy: Impaired ability to recognize or identify with the

feelings and needs of others; excessively attuned to
reactions of others, but only if perceived as relevant to self;
over- or underestimate of own effect on others.

b. Intimacy: Relationships largely superficial and exist to
serve self-esteem regulation; mutuality constrained by little
genuine interest in others‟ experiences and predominance
of a need for personal gain

B. Pathological personality traits in the following domain:
1. Antagonism, characterized by:

a. Grandiosity: Feelings of entitlement, either overt or covert;

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

8. Is often envious of others or believes that others are envious of

him or her.

9. Shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes.

self-centeredness; firmly holding to the belief that one is
better than others; condescending toward others.

b. Attention seeking: Excessive attempts to attract and be
the focus of the attention of others; admiration seeking.

C. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are relatively stable across time and
consistent across situations.

D. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not better understood as normative
for the individual‟s developmental stage or socio-cultural
environment.

E. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s

personality trait expression are not solely due to the direct
physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse,
medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., severe head
trauma).

Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder

DSM-IV Criteria DSM-5 Criteria – Revised June 2011

A. A pervasive pattern of preoccupation with orderliness, perfectionism,
and mental and interpersonal control, at the expense of flexibility,
openness, and efficiency, beginning by early adulthood and present
in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four (or more) of the

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose obsessive-compulsive
personality disorder, the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in personality functioning manifest by:
1. Impairments in self functioning (a or b):

a. Identity: Sense of self derived predominantly from work or
productivity; constricted experience and expression of

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

following:

1. Is preoccupied with details, rules, lists, order, organization, or

schedules to the extent that the major point of the activity is lost.

2. Shows perfectionism that interferes with task completion (e.g., is
unable to complete a project because his or her own overly strict
standards are not met).

3. Is excessively devoted to work and productivity to the exclusion
of leisure activities and friendships (not accounted for by
obvious economic necessity).

4. Is overconscientious, scrupulous, and inflexible about matters of
morality, ethics, or values (not accounted for by cultural or
religious identification).

5. Is unable to discard worn-out or worthless objects even when
they have no sentimental value.

6. Is reluctant to delegate tasks or to work with others unless they
submit to exactly his or her way of doing things.

7. Adopts a miserly spending style toward both self and others;
money is viewed as something to be hoarded for future
catastrophes.

8. Shows rigidity and stubbornness.

strong emotions.

b. Self-direction: Difficulty completing tasks and realizing
goals associated with rigid and unreasonably high and
inflexible internal standards of behavior; overly
conscientious and moralistic attitudes.

AND

2. Impairments in Interpersonal functioning (a or b):
a. Empathy: Difficulty understanding and appreciating the

ideas, feelings, or behaviors of others.

b. Intimacy: Relationships seen as secondary to work and
productivity; rigidity and stubbornness negatively affect
relationships with others.

B. Pathological personality traits in the following domains:
1. Compulsivity, characterized by:

a. Rigid perfectionism: Rigid insistence on everything being
flawless, perfect, without errors or faults, including one’s
own and others’ performance; sacrificing of timeliness to
ensure correctness in every detail; believing that there is
only one right way to do things; difficulty changing ideas
and/or viewpoint; preoccupation with details, organization,
and order.

2. Negative Affectivity, characterized by:
a. Perseveration: Persistence at tasks long after the behavior

has ceased to be functional or effective; continuance of the
same behavior despite repeated failures.

C. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are relatively stable across time and
consistent across situations.

D. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not better understood as normative

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

for the individual‟s developmental stage or socio-cultural
environment.

E. The impairments in personality functioning and the individual‟s
personality trait expression are not solely due to the direct
physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse,
medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., severe head
trauma).

Schizotypal Personality Disorder Schizotypal Personality Disorder

DSM-IV Criteria DSM-5 Criteria – Revised June 2011

A. A pervasive pattern of social and interpersonal deficits marked by
acute discomfort with, and reduced capacity for, close relationships
as well as by cognitive or perceptual distortions and eccentricities of
behavior, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of
contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following:
1. Ideas of reference (excluding delusions of reference).

2. Odd beliefs or magical thinking that influences behavior and is

inconsistent with subcultural norms (e.g., superstitiousness,
belief in clairvoyance, telepathy, or “sixth sense”; in children and
adolescents, bizarre fantasies or preoccupations).

3. Unusual perceptual experiences, including bodily illusions.

4. Odd thinking and speech (e.g., vague, circumstantial,
metaphorical, overelaborate, or stereotyped).

5. Suspiciousness or paranoid ideation.

6. Inappropriate or constricted affect.

The essential features of a personality disorder are impairments in
personality (self and interpersonal) functioning and the presence of
pathological personality traits. To diagnose schizotypal personality
disorder, the following criteria must be met:

A. Significant impairments in personality functioning manifest by:
1. Impairments in self functioning:

a. Identity: Confused boundaries between self and others;
distorted self-concept; emotional expression often not
congruent with context or internal experience.

b. Self-direction: Unrealistic or incoherent goals; no clear set
of internal standards.

2. Impairments in interpersonal functioning:
a. Empathy: Pronounced difficulty understanding impact of

own behaviors on others; frequent misinterpretations of
others‟ motivations and behaviors.

b. Intimacy: Marked impairments in developing close
relationships, associated with mistrust and anxiety.

B. Pathological personality traits in the following domains:
1. Psychoticism, characterized by:

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DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders

7. Behavior or appearance that is odd, eccentric, or peculiar.

8. Lack of close friends or confidants other than first-degree
relatives.

9. Excessive social anxiety that does not diminish with familiarity
and tends to be associated with paranoid fears rather than
negative judgments about self.

10. Does not occur exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia,
a Mood Disorder With Psychotic Features, another Psychotic
Disorder, or a Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

Note: If criteria are met prior to the onset of Schizophrenia, add
“Premorbid,” e.g., “Schizotypal Personality Disorder (Premorbid)

a. Eccentricity: Odd, unusual, or bizarre behavior or
appearance; saying unusual or inappropriate things.

b. Cognitive and perceptual dysregulation: Odd or unusual
thought processes; vague, circumstantial, metaphorical,
over-elaborate, or stereotyped thought or speech; odd
sensations in various sensory modalities.

c. Unusual beliefs and experiences: Thought content and
views of reality that are viewed by others as bizarre or
idiosyncratic; unusual experiences of reality.

2. Detachment, characterized by:
a. Restricted affectivity: Little reaction to emotionally

arousing situations; constricted emotional experience and
expression; indifference or coldness.

b. Withdrawal: Preference for being alone to being with
others; reticence in social …

Power

Control

FRAUD

The Seduction of Fraud
Prof. Sanya and Steve Morang

Week 3

Today’s Learning Objectives
Understand how different personality types fit into the
Seduction of Fraud methodology

Describe the concept of the archetypes including the
principles of Carl Jung’s Shadow

Learn how to identify the major steps in the seductive
process and how they can be applied.

Star Wars:
The Draw to the Dark Side

What is an archetype?

• The concept of an archetype
appears in areas relating to behavior,
modern psychological theory, and
literary analysis.

• Definition :
a recurrent symbol or motif in
literature, art, or mythology.
“mythological archetypes of good and
evil”

Carl Gustav Jung
1875-1961

Until you make the
Unconscious Conscious, it
will direct your life and you
will call it fate.

The Shadow in You

How many of you are familiar with the
concept of Narcissism or Narcissistic
Personality Disorder?

Opportunity
(existing or created)

Temptation
(with or without

Pressure)

Entitlement
(no justification or

rationalization
needed)

Boldness
This is the ability of the perpetrator to act in a manner that is considerably more

courageous and/or considerably more confident than an average person.

The Seduction of Fraud® Diamond

Narcissus

Narcissistic
Personality

Disorder

Narcissistic
Personality
Disorder –

DSM 5

Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Symptoms include:

• Excessive need for admiration
• Disregard for others feelings
• Inability to handle any criticism (hypersensitivity)
• A sense of entitlement
• Exploits others without guilt or shame
• Frequently demeans, intimidates and bullies others

Star Wars:
The Draw to the Dark Side

Anakin Skywalker – The Psychoanalysis

Anakin Skywalker – The Psychoanalysis

According to the authors, who reported their findings at the
American Psychiatric Association’s annual meeting in San
Diego, Skywalker meets the criteria for the condition
(Borderline Personality Disorder): He has difficulty controlling
anger, stress-related breaks with reality (after women in his life
die or leave), impulsivity (dangerous pod racing), obsession
with abandonment (those women again) and a “pattern of
unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized
by alternating between extremes of ideation and devaluation”
(hello, Obi-Wan).

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/bpd.cfm

Star Wars: The
Seduction
Begins 1/2

Merchants of
disinformation :

The Expert magician
seeks to deceive the
mind, rather than the
eye.

– Sol Stein

Star Wars: The
Seduction
Begins 2/2

Magicians are manipulating your
consciousness. They’re getting you to
construct a narrative, which simply
isn’t true. So that means they know
how to make you aware of certain
things and blind to others…. –
Richard Wiseman

Star Wars #1 –
The
Frustration

Star Wars #2 –
Something’s
Happening

Star Wars #3 –
Creating doubt
and temptation

Star Wars #4 –
Setting the
Trap

Star Wars #5
– The Turn to
the Dark Side

Key Takeaways

1. Seduction is a process that uses psychology,
deception, manipulation, and temptation to
control a specified target

2. Seduction experts will mix truth with lies, and
play on a target’s weakness such as self-
confidence or fear

3. A modern-day fraudster/seducer can deceive
and manipulate the perceptions of targets/
victims like a master magician

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Seduction of Fraud week 3

Week 3 Video:

https://elearning.ggu.edu/mod/page/view.php?id=1845363

Discussion Forum

This weeks discussion forum will be based on our review of the seductive process as
covered in this weeks recorded lesson. Please answer the following prompts:

1. Why do you believe that Chancellor Palpatine’s seduction of Anakin Skywalker to the
Dark Side was successful? What in particular do you think was the key to his success?

2. Would you consider Anakin Skywalker to be a high risk employee? If so, what were
some of his personality traits/ conditions that made him so?

3. What are your thoughts on the following statement, ” Humility is the worst form of
conceit.”?

Please find a book online

Questions:
Please answer the following questions for Week 3 Homework:
Based on your reading of Chapters 1& 2 of Duped, please answer the following
prompts:
1.) According to the author, what are some of the ways technology can facilitate
deception? Please provide some examples.
2.) What does it mean to compartmentalize ones thoughts and/or emotions?

https://elearning.ggu.edu/mod/page/view.php?id=1845363

Discussion Forum